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was not so much about lgbt rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, t
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal then surely the love we dmoyt one another must be equal as well. >>reporter: president insisting we address climate change and immigration arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled from our country there. were powerful performances. kelly clarkson stirring rendition of my country 'tis of thee. ♪ [ singing]. >>reporter: beyonce returning 4 years later this time to sing the national anthem. ♪ the rockets♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof ♪ through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ . >>reporter: as the president made his exit up those steps, a pause. turning around to take in his final inaugural moment one more time. microphone picking up what he said. >> about first couple made their way back to the white house, they emerge from the motorcade as they did 4 years ago. crowds cheering return home. first family taking in a parade. first couple with the kiss. the president moving to the
martin luther king jr. stood for civil rights, non-violence organized labor social justice and ending war. today america usually remembers one out of five. i'll start with you tom why is that? >> we all take from dr. king and larger than life figures what we choose to, and sometimes there is an interest involved like avoiding his strong criticism of the vietnam war in 1967, which was very unpopular at the time with some of the black ministers, with the "new york times," with organized labor with much of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civi
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i t
obama, "the bridge," talks about how he grew out of the civil rights movement, led by martin luther king. you write in the book, david, that race has been at the core of president obama's story. but it's not been in the foreground of his presidency. >> that's true. he's gotten some criticism for that from some bloack leaders. he views his presence in the white house is essential. and everything he can do, whether it's improving the economy or keeping the united states safe, improves the lives of all americans. he's very wary of being the president of black america. he's insistent on being the president of the united states. and sometimes, that's caused him difficulty with certain black leaders. cornell west is one. there's others. >> and you said the president blames his americanism. what did you mean by that? >> president obama is very clear, he has the opportunity to represent all of america. he realizes that that history helps him lead the entire country. and so, he's claimed his america is not simply as black america. >> i was just going to say. this is also the 150th anniversary her
and fail without controversy. understand, a lot of civil rights leaders from that era resist putting the gay rights movement within the civil rights movement. so i think when a lot of this has gone to pass, we will remember the bigness of the gay rights. >> was it a big speech? was it a partisan speech? >> well, it was both. it had elements of boat. let me agree with what cornell said. i couldn't help but notice the man who signed the defensive marriage act, bill clinton, opposed to gay marriage changed his position during the course of his presidency. >> every speech before 2004, looking for a constitution to ban gay marriage. >> i welcome it. what i didn't welcome was the most polarizing president that we had became more polarized. this was a speech for the 51% who voted for him. there wasn't much more for the 49% who did not. it was a speech that talked about collective action by the government and when you look at the biggest issue that we face of this era, it's the deficit. it's the trillion dollars of debt and the president didn't really talk about that. he talked about, we're
. the president referenced the slain civil rights leader prominently in the remarks. he took on gay rights and immigration and entitlements and the deep political divide across our nation. first to the parade route. john roberts will travel with the parade along pennsylvania avenue if the technical gods allow it. john, good afternoon. >> so far the gods are with us. if we could spin the camera over here a little bit you can see the east front of the capitol the president will join the motorcade coming out of the driveway from the east front to the constitution avenue. this will be in the next hour and a half to two hours. the parade is 1.5 mile long including a mix of civilian and military contributions, mostly marching bands and a lost floats that will be brought in from the civilian side of things something implemented in 1841 by william henry harrison. you will know he liked to do things big. he had the longist inaugural address of anyone at two hours in horrible weather and he did not wear a hat or cold and he died 30 days later but he had floats in the parade. there are 2,100 members
inauguration coverage. i'm soledad o'brien. let's get to james clyburn, veteran of the civil rights movement to talk about inauguration day. >> nice to be here. >> our pleasure. we've heard about the two tables th bibles that president obama will be sworn in with. i'm curious to know what you think about the cyclical nature. 50 years ago, march on washington, 50 years later, a black president is being sworn in for a second term. do you -- >> right. >> is it an indication that there have been some big steps toward progress in this country? >> sure. sure. big steps. but many, many steps left to go. all of us are aware that this president came into office, like the 40th year, and a whole lot of things haven't happened, and he is -- he has been met with some really tough times. not just the reaction to him, but because of the challenges that the country faces and i believe that so much of what president obama has confronted was forecast by martin luther king jr. >> what do you mean? >> take health care, for instance. to me, one of the most important speeches ever made by king had to do with heal
tarheel. and the civil rights movement at that time was working towards getting a public accommodations law that eventually came apart in 1964. the student newspaper supported the marchers. we had some black students in chapel hill at that time and felt that if they couldn't eat in the same restaurants with all the rest of us, that budget right. and so all of these photographs were taken initially for either the student newspaper or for i served as a string err for some of the -- stringer for some of the local wire services and what not. today in publishing the book one of the purposes was to let some of today's generation who still live in chapel hill and are descendants from the people in photographs know and understand what their parents and grandparents did so that they can enjoy the same freedoms that in some manner they take for granted often today to be able to go into a lunch counter or wherever. >> host: so 1961-1964, and i'm guessing you can speak to the majority of these and you can recall the moment? we're looking at this one right here, group of folks in front of a merchant
to the left. >> as a civil rights issue of. >> that's right. he talked about global climate change and how we will attack that. immigration reform. by the way, there is jay-z and beyonce. >> by the way, she looks fantastic. >> moving on quickly. she is an incredibly beautiful woman. megyn: i defended him when he said it as well. [laughter] [talking over each other] >> i was just saying that i think both of you have points well taken. pillars in the eyes of the democrats and liberals of the american social progress in american society. he was also advancing some items which were not well established one can say he's the president, he got elected, he's got a mandate. but he wasn't saying that he was going to meet republican pathway. >> the president and the vice president with the official signing. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> thank you very much. [applause] megyn: we received about a dozen e-mails from our folks and viewers elaborating on what the crypt area is. it is called that because george washington was supposed to be buried there. but he was not because his fa
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
in an inaugural address and him linking civil rights and women's rights and gay rights and mentioning the stonewall uprising that gave birth to the gay rights movement was i thought a significant articulation of a vision of where the country is. >> that may be his vision but can he really get there? and particularly with a speech like that. certainly it had to do with being a second term as well. but with a speech like that, which was really sort of an in-your-face speech, how does he get what he wants? >> well, i think it is the obvious question, and i mean one thing you can say is, well, the way he tried in the first term, he does not think was successful. he got some things done obviously. got some big things done with health care. but in the end he wasn't able to get those things done with that style of leadership. so he's going to try something new. i don't know that it will work. gwen: does the speech help or hurt that? >> the speech makes clear he's adopting a different approach. one of the things he said was, we're not going to resolve centuries old debates about the role of g
democratic state senator henry marsh a lifelong civil rights advocate left town to attend president obama's inauguration yesterday, the g.o.p. took advantage using their one-day majority of 20-19 to pass new redistricting lines that would create more republican-dominated districts. but in an apparent peace offering, virginia republicans did honor martin luther king as they adjourned. i'm kidding. they actually honored confederate general stonewall jackson on dr. king's holiday. tasteful. joining me now from d.c. is political reporter joe williams. and here with me in new york is the only and only sam seder host of the majority report. thank you for your time tonight to discuss all of this malfeasance. joe, let me start with you because my head hurts over this. help me out here. 41 votes to maintain a filibuster instead of 60 to break it. is that the kind of reform harry reid has been promising month after month? >> basically it is change we can believe in if you're a senator because what they want is a rule that can benefit them when they're in the minority. and that is kind of a half mea
was a veteran of the civil rights fight. double crassness to do it on the fact he's out of town attending the inraugation of the first black president. lee jackson king day, i was there. doesn't surprise me at all. what happens is you don't have a state where the consequences have to be paid for these kind of actions. you don't have a significant voting block. virginia has flipped from blue to red on the local level. not a whole lot of pushback from the democrats on the voter side until they get punished for these kind of actions it will continue. >> john: joe williams and host of ring of fire and the majority report sam seder. love talking to both of you. thank you forget for coming on. >> yet another mass shooting this time in the gun friendly state of texas. my congratulations to wayne lapierrre and the nra coming up. >> john: there was another shooting at another school today. this time in texas. at lone star college. the shooter wounded three people one critically, despite being surrounded by good guys with guns. thankfully, no one was killed. this shooting like all of the others tha
is the country's oldest civil rights group joining a lawsuit against the city of new york? we'll tell you, then a little bit later this hour, why some kentucky insiders are warning ashley judd away from a senate run. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ ♪ ♪ tossing and turning have given way to sleeping. where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. as
movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i think that george's, george's proclivities were always in and around social justice. i know that he was raised catholic. so was i. 16 years of catholic school has made me the man i am today. [laughter] >> and harvey influenced by jewish culture, you know, i don't think it's ever been explored enough. but if you talk to every brit, you know that harvey was a very, very much impacted by the holocaust. you know, if you remember, it happened in the '40s. it's only 20 years or so since he came onto the scene. and i think he was able to transfer, you know, that tragedy and that oppression into what was happening with gay people. he was very scrappy. i wanted to acknowledge two people who were very supportive of harvey milk and george moscone, and both of them have left us and that's howard wallace and hank wilson. (applause) >> what i loved about them was, what i loved about them was they knocked back a few and really get into it with harvey abo
are allowed, and civil rights attorneys will say that happens, that's allowed all over the country. what bratton did in new york was a much more aggressive form of that. there was -- in heavy crime areas, drug market, open-air drug market areas. you had a very intensive use of stop and frisk. and it had -- there was a -- now, those drug market areas in new york were heavily impacted. now, whether they could have been impacted without stop and frisk is an open question. sociologists say. so, but bratton and other police advocates would say it was instrumental, but, again, that's an open question whether it was, how necessary that was. >> now, how much interaction will bratton have with the community? because at the city council this week, there was heated public testimony for hours with people opposed to having him in the city of oakland and bringing his policies here. how effective can he be if the community doesn't support him? >> it's an interesting question. originally, he was going to be leading the town hall forums where he would be interacting with the community and recognizing the
in publicly on a bible once used by the civil rights leader. he'll also use a bible that was once used by abraham lincoln. 800,000 people are expected in the national mall. >> what we're doing is celebrating each other and celebrating this incredible nation we call home. >> reporter: the president and vice president, along with their famili families, will start by attending st. john's. the swearing-in is followed by a parade and the glitzy inaugural balls. the security is extremely tight. 15,000 military and law enforcement personnel will watch over the proceedings. >> watching an event this large, with this number of people coming, takes a lot of corporate nation. >> reporter: the president and first lady showed off their love. the president weighing in on his wife's new hair-do. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. >> let me tell you, it has just been a true thrill to watch this handsome, charming individual grow into the man and the president that he is. >> reporter: in a speech, president obama will reach out to some of those people who voted against him opinion and he'll call on w
the president will swear inpublically with a bible used by the civil rights leader and place his hands on a bible used by abraham lincoln. 800,000 people are expected to pack the national paul. >> we are -- mall. >> we are celebrating each other and celebrating the incredible nation that we call home. >> reporter: the president and vice president along with the families will begin the day by attending church at st. john's across from the white house an inaugural tradition. it's followed by the big parade and the glitzy inaugural balls. security is extremely tight 13,000 military and law enforcement personnel will watch over the proceedings. >> protecting an event this large with this many venues and this number of people coming requires a lot of coordination and a lot of organization. >> reporter: overnight, mr. obama and the first lady with supporters at an inaugural reception showed off their love. the president weighing in on his wife's new hairdo. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. >> let me tell you it's just been a true thrill to watch this handsome, charming individual grow in
on the same day the nation pauses to remember civil rights legend and icon dr. martin luther king jr.. two men, two very different dreams forever linked. it is monday january 21st inauguration day and good morning. thank you for joining fox 5 special coverage. i'm allison seymour. >> i'm tony perkins. we are broadcasting from our temporary fox 5 studios high atop the canadian embassy. it's a beautiful building and a beautiful view. we are blocks from where all the accident gets underway. we will bring it all to you live all morning long as we mentioned earlier. this is president obama's 4th oath of office. he took his third yesterday. we'll show you a little bit of that. >> chief justice john roberts administered the oath. the president has two swearing in ceremonies because inauguration day fell yesterday. he had two of the first time around because he and justice roberts flood their lines during the public ceremony. >> vice president joe biden was also sworn in yesterday morning just as he administered his oath at the naval observatory. >> today's oaths will take place just before the noon h
groups and civil rights groups and some scholars is that we put together this omnibus road to electoral reform bill. it's 199 pages long. it has over 50 important changes, and you named some of them all right. and what we're doing is saying as far as we've come already voting still has a little bit more perfection. we can make it better, make it easier, make it friendly to the voters. that's what some people in politics don't want to do, but that's what those of us that are 160 in number, including senator kirsten gillibrand in new york just introduced, and we'll have our work cut out for us to make the election fair and easier for the american citizen. >> john: is this designed to help democratic voters or do both parties try to play dirty tricks with each other's voters? have democrats tried to suppress republican votes as well? >> we're not angels on the democratic side, but i cannot name you one instance to document that. i don't know about it. and look, all republicans are not all bad guys. a lot of these things are being done by their political organizations by a few elected offic
" column as a difference between civil rights and civil liberties under this administration? guest: the inauguration speech was picking up a very common and almost mantra in the obama administration of achieving equality, which is a noble and important goal. i think the most significant thing about the inauguration speech, which are particularly thought was wonderful, was his reference to gay-rights and to the gay movement. it established his commitment to equality. i want to note that he has not been particularly aggressive in supporting gay rights in his first administration. his administration in court argued the same arguments as the bush administration. he still refuses to make clear his position on key legal aspects of gay-rights. and so, the first term obama was not nearly as passionate as that speech would suggest. but what was missing once again was a discussion of civil liberties. i think it does reflect this grewat this-- -- great schism in the democratic and liberal community. i wrote a column two years ago about how barack obama has destroyed the civil liberties movem
luther king, junior. hundreds celebrated the civil rights leader legacy. he lead the congregation and he says dr. king focused on people in need. >> he was concerned about and trying to make sure that he really touched the real people, those who had greatest need. and of course there were those who were in poverty and those who were poor and those who had no jobs. >> he has taken dr. king's message to heart. it provides more than one million free meals a year along with affordable housing and health care. >> tomorrow is a holiday so a lot of people will be off and wondering what the weather will be like. >> exactly. leigh glaser will be back. >> it will be terrific. if you look back east at the inauguration festivities. washington, d.c., the expected temperature is 42 degrees. a 30% chance of a few snow showers. it looks high and dry and 52 for dallas and phoenix 75. if you are traveling airbeds -- around the state it will be a mild to almost warm day statewide. southern california is getting up into the 80s. my map is going to come up here in a second. 80 degrees for los angeles. san di
, junior. hundreds celebrated the civil rights leader legacy. he lead the congregation and he says dr. king focused on people in need. >> he was concerned about and trying to make sure that he really touched the real people, those who had greatest need. and of course there were those who were in poverty and those who were poor and those who had no jobs. >> he has taken dr. king's message to heart. it provides more than one million free meals a year along with affordable housing and health care. >> tomorrow is a holiday so a lot of people will be off and wondering what the weather will be like. >> exactly. leigh glaser will be back. >> it will be terrific. if you look back east at the inauguration festivities. washington, d.c., the expected temperature is 42 degrees. a 30% chance of a few snow showers. it looks high and dry and 52 for dallas and phoenix 75. if you are traveling airbeds -- around the state it will be a mild to almost warm day statewide. southern california is getting up into the 80s. my map is going to come up here in a second. 80 degrees for los angeles. san diego warming to
, daughter of the civil rights leader joins us today. your father's personal bible is used in the swearing in today, along with a bible that belongsed to abraham lincoln. tell me about your father's bible. >> that bible is at least 59 years of age, because in it are markings. such as 5-10-54. he was using this as a bible to meditate and pray and prepare himself for leadership in the church. very tattered. we did a little repairing on it, restoration, so it wouldn't fall apart when the president places his hand on it. >> that would be a bad thing to happen in the middle of the inauguration ceremony. i know you are preparing to speak at ebenezer church today, because, of course, what a great coincidence of timing, today we also celebrate your father's legacy as well, on the same day we inaugurate a president. what will you talk about? how do the two things intersect for you? >> first and foremost, the fact that the president is using daddy's bible is heart warming for me. my father was first and foremost a preacher, pastor, it reminds people of that. that is one of the things i will stress t
of the civil rights act and the voting changes that occurred then. but since then, we've heard no mention of the right to vote in this country being a protected right and the sanctity of that idea. i think the only thing -- first of all, we gotta remember, we vote every two years in this country. not every four. that needs to be the refrain from -- every time you talk about an election, anybody within the sound of my voice needs to -- when they talk about voting or any of those things or what's going to happen in the next election, you're not talking about 2016. you're talking about 2014. those often matter more so because that's when they sneak these folks through. that's when purple districts turn red because people are look the other way or are too busy. thanks for the call. appreciate it. we'll be back right after this. more of "the stephanie miller show". celebrating her mom's 90th birthday. >> she'll be back tomorrow though. >> she will. >> i'm sorry. that's inappropriate. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." desmond tutu said a quote that is one of my favorite quotes. "w
and you have a candidate who said i would do this day vote against the civil rights act. >> john: that was rand paul. i think rand paul is like rick santorum in that he's not running for president but for higher public speaking fees for the rest of his life. it will be hillary against chris christie, a new york senator against a new jersey governor. his views are opposite of most of america. we know over 70% favor abortion rights. chris christie does not. do you think people would realize even a guy they like can have policies they don't like or is charisma more important than ideology? >> is that a trick question? >> john: no, it's a very real question. look at george w. bush. >> we love charisma and we love politicians with swagger. he has done good things with new jersey. you drive through and it even smells better. >> john: who doubt, and who cannot cheer what he has done for sandy victims. >> and the police forces, they love him too. >> john: and we could use that tunnel to manhattan as well. >> to predict anything about what chris christie's bigger play is on the national s
at weather. tony and allison, back out to you guys. >> all right. tucker, thank you so much. >> today is the national holiday honoring dr. martin luther king jr.. a wreath ceremony was held on sunday for the civil right's leader. among the dignataries on hand, jesse jackson, jamie foxx and chris tucker. the dr. king inauguration weekend, an intersection of history. >> the first family's busy day has already begun. the president, the first lady and their two daughters left for church at saint john's. >> sarah simmons has our coverage from the other end of pennsylvania avenue and tell us what we can expect to see. she's overlooking the parade reviewing stand at lafayette park. >> reporter: that's right. we're here right behind me is where the president will be sitting to view the parade as it comes through. here you can already see we have a lot of people already showing up taking their spot here to watch the parade as well. what a wonderful place to be able to watch it. his president will be in his glass enclosed heated area viewing the parades. it wasn't until the late 1800s actually
with dr. king's family, luminaries from the civil rights movement to politics for hollywood all there. dick gregory al sharpton, jesse jackson, jamie foxx. another breathe wreath laying is planned today at the memorial at 1:00 p.m. >>> and there is a lot straight ahe. we are just getting started with our special coverage of inauguration day 2013. >> stick with us. when we come right back, we'll check in with our wisdom martin who is on the national month as crowds continue to gather there. we'll show you what you can or cannot have with you when you come downtown today. stay with us. fox 5 morning news just getting started. started. started. go, go, go, go! bye sweetie. honey what are you doing? we gotta go! it's dress-like-a-president day, i'm supposed to be martin van buren. who? martin van buren! google? martin van buren. ♪ >>> welcome back. if you are up this early on this inauguration day, it is the martin luther king holiday, chances are you are getting ready to head on down downtown today to take in some of the inaug>> you can bet that you wi not be alone. you will be joined
? >>> the fight over new york's jumbo soda ban is becoming a civil rights issue. >> and man's best -- i just -- this makes me laugh. in man's friend can be good for more than just fetching your slippers. a furry friend that saved a life. this little guy. >>> howard here with your weather first. another some system on the way -- storm system on the way. some light snow developing this afternoon could hamper the ride home. high temperatures 25 to 30. back if just a few minutes with your, the if just a few -- in just a few minutes with your weekend forecast. >>> and howard we're in the calm between the storms as far as weather and traffic is concerned right now. outer loop of the beltway light volume as you head west of silver spring and past connecticut avenue into bethesda. pretty much light volume all around town which is great news. andrea mike back to you. >>> all right beverly thank you. making news now at 6:13. >> the naacm and the hispanic federation are fighting new york city's ban on -- sorry on sugary drinks. it's unfair to small minority owned businesses like the groups claim larger
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